Cinnamon and Red Chile Ketchup Recipe

This sophisticated and flavor-packed Cinnamon and Red Chile Ketchup Recipe bears little resemblance to the bottle of Heinz Tomato Ketchup you may have in the fridge… This homemade ketchup is free of preservatives, sugar, and fillers, so the flavors shine!

A hand dipping a sweet potato fry into Homemade Cinnamon and Red Chile Ketchup in a glass bowl.

Heinz Ketchup is grown, not made…

~~ Heinz marketing slogan.

👩🏻‍🍳 Tamara Talks – Why Make Homemade Ketchup?

As with so many commercially produced and marketed foods, the company wants to persuade consumers that their product is actually healthy, when it fact, the product is full of everything but healthy ingredients. Specifically, the label on the back of the ketchup lists tomato juice concentrate and distilled (cheap) vinegar as the #1 and #2 ingredients respectively.

They break sugars into two types: high fructose corn syrup and corn syrup. This allows them to list sugars lower on the list of ingredients, when if combined sugar would rank much higher. Both are added sugars, and they ought to be very limited in a healthy diet.

So, what is the answer to this conundrum? Why DIY of course! Ketchup is easy to make, and stores well. You can store the homemade ketchup in the refrigerator for up to a month, and much longer in zip bags in your freezer. What are you waiting for?

You really ought to give this condiment recipe a try! I started with the Homemade Ketchup recipe from Epicurious.com. I’ve made this recipe many times, and modify its flavor profile to suit my needs at the time…

Here is a quick look at the ingredients in the recipe – it’s handy to use at the grocery store or as a summary of what you need. Skip to the recipe for quantities.

  • olive oil
  • onion
  • garlic 
  • ground red chile powder – This can be New Mexico, ancho, or chipotle ground chile powder. Avoid generic “chili powder” which is a spice blend that includes other ingredients.
  • ground cinnamon
  • smoked paprika
  • ground cumin
  • diced tomatoes with their juice
  • tomato paste
  • brown sugar 
  • apple cider vinegar
  • sea salt and fresh ground pepper

step 1

If using a slow cooker, heat the olive oil in a small saute pan on medium-high heat. If cooking on the stove, use a medium sauce pan. Add the onion and garlic, then sauté until the onion is translucent (3 to 5 minutes). Add the red chile powder, cinnamon, smoked paprika, and cumin. Sauté until fragrant (another 2 to 3 minutes).

step 2

If using a slow cooker, scrape the ingredients from the sauté pan into the slow cooker, then add the remaining ingredients. If using the stove top, add the remaining ingredients to the sauce pan you started with. Cook 4 hours in the slow cooker or 45 minutes on the stove on a low simmer. Stir occasionally.

step 3

Allow mixture to cool before using an immersion blender to blend until smooth.

💭 Tips

  • Store the finished ketchup in glass jars or other container, and use as desired. It will keep for up to a month in the refrigerator, and in the freezer much longer.
  • Play with the spices to achieve a different flavor profile if desired. We love the cinnamon and red chile with roasted sweet potato wedges. Add gochujang for a Korean flair, or harissa paste or powder for a Middle Eastern vibe.
  • I have not poured hot liquids into a blender to purée in years. Immersion blenders are much safer and less messy. If you don’t have one, cool the mixture prior to adding it to the blender
How long can I keep my homemade ketchup?

Store it in the refrigerator for up to a month, and in the freezer for several months. We don’t use a lot of ketchup, so I freeze portions in small zip bags.

Cinnamon and Red Chile Ketchup in mason jars and a small bowl with sweet potato fries.

Cinnamon and Red Chile Ketchup

Cinnamon, New Mexico ground red chile, cumin, and smoked paprika provide depth and flavor to this homemade ketchup… low in sugar and without additives and preservatives!
5 from 1 vote

Click to rate!

Prep Time 10 minutes
Cook Time 45 minutes
Total Time 55 minutes
Course Condiment
Cuisine American Southwest
Servings 4 cups
Calories 38 kcal

Ingredients
  

  • 1 tablespoon olive oil
  • 1 medium onion - chopped
  • 1 teaspoon garlic - minced
  • 1 tablespoon New Mexico ground red chile powder see notes
  • 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon
  • 1 teaspoon smoked paprika
  • 1 teaspoon cumin
  • 2 cans diced tomatoes with their juice
  • 1 tablespoon tomato paste
  • cup brown sugar - packed
  • ½ cup apple cider vinegar
  • ½ teaspoon salt
  • a few grinds pepper

Instructions

  • If using a slow cooker, heat the olive oil in a small saute pan on medium-high heat. If cooking on the stove, use a medium sauce pan. Add the onion and garlic, then saute until the onion is translucent (3 to 5 minutes). Add the red chile powder, cinnamon, smoked paprika, and cumin. Saute until fragrant (another 2 to 3 minutes).
  • If using a slow cooker, scrape the ingredients from the saute pan into the slow cooker, then add the remaining ingredients. If using the stove top, add the remaining ingredients to the sauce pan you started with.

Stove Top

  • Cook covered on low heat 45 minutes to an hour, stirring occasionally. Allow mixture to cool. Using an immersion blender puree until smooth. See notes.

Slow Cooker

  • Cook 4 hours on high with the cover on. Unplug the cooker, and allow it to cool slightly.
  • Using an immersion blender puree until smooth. See notes.

To Serve

  • Store the finished ketchup in glass jars or other container, and use as desired. It will keep for up to a month in the refrigerator, and in the freezer much longer.
  • Enjoy!

Notes

I use New Mexico Dixon red chile. The area of northern NM between Santa Fe and Taos is renowned for its red chile. Chimayo and Dixon (2 small villages in the area) argue over who’s chile is best… They’re both amazing! Ground ancho or chipotle make great substitutes!
I have not poured hot liquids into a blender to puree in years. Immersion blenders are much safer and less messy. If you don’t have one, cool the mixture prior to adding it to the blender.

Nutrition

Serving: 2tablespoons | Calories: 38kcal

NOTE: Macronutrients are an approximation only using unbranded ingredients and MyFitnessPal.com. Please do your own research with the products you’re using if you have a serious health issue or are following a specific diet.

Did you make this recipe? Please leave a comment and/or star rating! Email us with any questions: tamara@beyondmeresustenance.com

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22 Comments

    1. I know I can count on you to try any of my recipes that include chile MJ! Thanks! I think you’ll find it’s so easy and so much more flavorful…

    1. Thanks Ludmilla! I guess it’s not the all-purpose sort of ketchup, but I think it would go with most things you want to use with ketchup!

  1. Wow this is really good. Never thought I should check bottle of ketchup for fillers. Well stuff we put in our mouth which aint real food, with this at least we can enjoy ketchup guilt free.

    1. I have gotten to where I look at every label Suchi. The worst offender is commercially produced salad dressing, but this is right up there! You should try making it…

  2. Cinnamon! That’s going to add a nice complexity…

    I almost never have ketchup in the house, but every once in a while a food calls out for it – and then I’m sort of stuck. I may need to play with this, and freeze it in small containers. That would work…

    1. It would definitely work! I play with the flavors, and if cinnamon and red chile aren’t your “thing,” I’m sure you can find a combo to your liking. I hope you give it a try 🙂

    1. First, I’m glad to hear you’ve got an immersion blender! I run into so many people that still have to pour hot stuff into a blender (like for a pureed soup) and it makes me cringe. I think once you make your own ketchup, you’ll never go back 🙂