Tamarillo Curd Mini Tarts

Complex sweet and citric flavors makes these Tamarillo Curd Mini Tarts sing. With an easy-to-make gluten free pastry, a fabulous tamarillo curd, whipped cream, and fresh mint garnish, this approachable dessert tart looks fancy but is not difficult to make. Frozen tamarillo pulp is widely available, so you don’t have to look for the fresh fruit! You’ll want to check this exotic dessert recipe out!

A yellow plate with 7 Tamarillo Curd Mini Tarts, and extra whipped cream, tamarillo curd...

👩🏻‍🍳 Tamara Talks – What is Tamarillo/Tree Tomato?

I first had tree tomatoes (aka tamarillo, sachatomate) at the Wayra Restaurant in Urubamba, Cuzco, Peru in this grilled scallops with sachatomate (local tomato tree) butter. The seared scallops were presented on the half shell on a puddle of savory tamarillo butter. Wow! It made quite an impression!

It is equally suitable for sweet and savory applications. While I worked on this tart recipe, I found fresh tamarillo. I’m working on several tamarillo recipes – a salsa, a salmon with tamarillo sauce, and a “how to prepare fresh tamarillo” video. This recipe uses frozen tamarillo pulp which is pretty widely available in markets that feature Latino foods.

I’ve chosen to do a tamarillo curd recipe that is similar to the passionfruit curd in this Peruvian dessert. Both are made with Goya frozen tropical fruit pulp. If you are not familiar with curds, they’re worth getting to know!

What is a “curd?”

A fruit curd is a type of sweet spread or filling made from fruit juice or pulp, zest, sugar, eggs, and butter. It is typically thick and creamy in texture, similar to a pudding or custard. The mixture is cooked over low heat; the eggs and butter give the curd its smooth and velvety texture.

Fruit curd can be made with a wide variety of fruits, including lemon, lime, orange, passionfruit, raspberry, mango, and even tamarillo/tree tomatoes. Lemon curd is probably the most well-known and popular type of fruit curd, and is often used as a filling for tarts, cakes, and pastries.

Fruit curd should be stored in the refrigerator and can last for several weeks. It is a delicious and versatile ingredient that can be used in a variety of ways, from topping toast, scones, and English muffins to filling pies or layer cakes.

📋 Tamarillo Tart Ingredients

Here is a quick look at the ingredients in the recipe – it’s handy to use at the grocery store or as a summary of what you need. Skip to the recipe for quantities.

Pastry Ingredients

Ingredients for the tamarillo tart pastry: Almond and coconut flour, eggs, sugar, salt, and butter.
  • coconut flour – If gluten is not a concern, feel free to substitute “regular” flour for both flours. I have not tried it!
  • fine almond flour – I love the combination of the coconut and almond flour. I don’t entirely avoid wheat flour, but I do when I can. You’re probably fine to use wheat flour for both the coconut and the almond flour if you prefer.
  • sugar – On photo day, I used coconut sugar. I am always looking for ingredients that are less-refined. I really like this sugar, but you certainly don’t have to use it. Coconut sugar is used in a 1:1 ratio with white sugar. You might like brown sugar or turbinado sugar as well.
  • eggs
  • butter – For this recipe, I recommend unsalted butter.
  • salt – I like a fine sea salt for this recipe.

Tamarillo Curd Ingredients

Ingredients for the tamarillo curd: Sugar, butter, tamarillo purée, eggs, salt, lime zest.
  • tamarillo pulp – I have no problem finding frozen tamarillo pulp in McAllen. You can substitute any fresh fruit pulp. If you are fortunate enough to have fresh tamarillo pulp, by all means use it!
  • sugar – On photo day, I used coconut sugar. I am always looking for ingredients that are less-refined. I really like this sugar, but you certainly don’t have to use it. Coconut sugar is used in a 1:1 ratio with white sugar. You might like brown sugar or turbinado sugar as well.
  • eggs
  • butter – I use unsalted butter. If you have salted butter, check the seasoning before adding salt.
  • lime zest – Orange zest or lemon zest will be fine as well.
  • salt – I like fine sea salt!

To Assemble Tamarillo Curd Mini Tarts

  • pastry crusts – If you want to make the tarts, but not the pastry, consider using prepared crusts.
  • tamarillo curd – If you want to make this lovely dessert, and can’t get tamarillo curd, all is not lost! Consider using one of the other frozen fruit pulps!
  • whipped cream – I use 1/2 cup whipping cream, 1 tablespoon confectioner’s sugar, and 1/2 teaspoon vanilla. It’s fine to use purchased whipped cream, but make sure it’s not imitation whipped cream!
  • garnishes – Fresh mint and thin-sliced limes are nice.

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🔪 Instructions

An hour is a sufficient amount of time to complete the tamarillo tarts. Make the pastry and bake it. While the pastry bakes, start the tamarillo curd, followed by the whipped cream. NOTE: If you want to make ahead, keep the components separate until closer to serving time!

Step 1 - Combining the pastry ingredients in a glass bowl with a red spatula.
  • Make the pastry dough – Start by preheating your oven to 350°. Add the dry ingredients to a medium prep bowl, and whisk thoroughly to combine. Add the beaten eggs and melted (and cooled) butter. You can use a spatula or your hands to combine it all. The dough is stiff, and I usually use my hands!
Step 2 - The gluten free pastry pressed into orange silicone tart pans.
  • Form the pastry – The reason I like this pastry recipe is because I can press the dough into the forms, avoiding rolling.
Step 3 - The baked tart pastry in an orange silicone tart pan.
  • Bake the pastry – Bake until golden brown (about 15-18 minutes). NOTE: I use “convection bake.” It reduces cooking time about 20%, and 15 minutes gets them done. Set aside until you’re ready to assemble the tarts and serve.
Step 4 - A glass bowl with the whisked coconut sugar and tamarillo pulp.
  • Start the tamarillo curd – NOTE: If you use coconut sugar like I did, your curd will be brown like mine is. If you use white sugar, it will be more the color of the tamarillo pulp. Whisk or use a hand mixer to combine the sugar and tamarillo pulp. If you add the eggs to just the tamarillo, you risk the acidity affecting the texture.
Step 5 - A glass bowl with the eggs, sugar, and tree tomato pulp.
  • Finish mixing the tamarillo curd ingredients – Add the cooled melted butter, the zest, and the beaten eggs. Mix thoroughly!
Step 6 - A small saucepan with the thickened tamarillo/tree tomato curd and a red spatula.
  • Cook the tamarillo curd ingredients – If you’re an experienced cook that pays attention, you can cook it with direct heat (medium) on the stove. Otherwise, you’re better off to use a double boiler. Cook, stirring constantly, until it thickens and coats the back of a spoon. NOTE: Curd thickens as it cools.
Step 7 - A yellow plate with the pastry tarts filled with tamarillo/tree tomato curd, a yellow striped napkin, and a jar with more curd.
  • Fill the tart pastry – Spoon about 2 tablespoons of the slightly cooled curd into each baked tart shell.
  • Finish assembling the tamarillo tarts – After filling each pastry with the tree tomato curd, top them with whipped cream and chiffonade of fresh mint and thin-sliced lime as desired. Enjoy!
A yellow plate with completed tarts, and the components for assembling them.

❓ FAQ

Is tamarillo/tree tomato healthy?

Yes, the tree tomato, also known as tamarillo, is a nutritious fruit that is considered healthy. It is low in calories but high in vitamins, minerals, and antioxidants.

What’s the best way to store tamarillo pulp?

Most of the tamarillo available is frozen and should stay that way until ready to use. I have frozen whole tamarillo and tamarillo pulp in my freezer right now. I put the plastic package it comes in inside a gallon freezer bag, or one of my silicone freezer bags for added protection. Invariably, a package gets a small (undetectable) tear, and when I thaw the frozen pulp, it leaks out all over the place. No bueno!

Do tree tomatoes taste like regular tomatoes?

NO! They taste like a slightly acidic tropical fruit. They’re hard to describe, but I’ll try. The texture is a little like a mango or papaya. They are sweet and tangy at the same time.

💭 Tips

While you can certainly purée fresh tamarillo, you may not be able to find them. Save the time and trouble, and use the frozen tamarillo pulp. It is widely available in markets with a decent selection of Latin foods.

STORAGE – If you have leftover tamarillo curd, store it in the refrigerator for about a week. Spread it on toast or English muffins!

The curd will thicken up quite a bit as it cools. I let it come to warm or room temperature before spooning into the pastry.

Have I convinced you to look for tamarillo curd in your market’s freezer section? If you love to try new desserts, you’ll want to give this one a try!

Signature in red and green with chiles and limes. Healthyish Latin cuisine.

7 tamarillo/tree tomato tarts on a yellow plate topped with whipped cream and fresh mint.

Tamarillo/Tree Tomato Dessert Tarts

A gluten free mini tart crust filled with tamarillo/tree tomato curd and topped with whipped cream and fresh mint!
5 from 5 votes
Print Recipe Pin Recipe Save Recipe
Prep Time 30 minutes
Cook Time 30 minutes
Total Time 1 hour
Course Desserts
Cuisine Eclectic, Peruvian
Servings 8 tarts
Calories 407 kcal

Ingredients
  

Pastry

  • ¾ cup super fine almond flour - see Ingredients in post
  • ¾ cup coconut flour - see Ingredients in post
  • 1 tablespoon sugar - coconut, turbinado, or white granulated
  • ½ teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 2 large eggs - whisked thoroughly
  • 6 tablespoons butter - melted and slightly cooled

Tamarillo/Tree Tomato Curd

  • cup tamarillo pulp - thawed
  • 6 tablespoons unsalted butter - melted and cooled
  • 1 cup sugar - coconut, turbinado, or white granulated
  • ½ teaspoon fine sea salt
  • 3 large eggs - vigorously whisked
  • 1 lime - zest only!

Assemble the Tarts

  • baked mini tarts pastry
  • tamarillo/tree tomato curd
  • whipped cream
  • fresh mint - chiffonade

Instructions

Pastry

  • Preheat oven to 350 degrees (325 convection). Whisk dry ingredients together in a medium prep bowl. Add the whisked eggs and melted butter. Combine well! NOTE: Hands work well. The dough is stiff.
  • Press into your tart pans. Bake until golden brown (about 15-18 minutes). Set aside until you're ready to assemble the tarts and serve.

Tamarillo/Tree Tomato Curd

  • Whisk or use a hand mixer to combine the sugar and tamarillo pulp.
  • Add the cooled melted butter, the zest, and the beaten eggs. Mix thoroughly!
  • If you're an experienced cook that pays attention, you can cook it with direct heat (medium) on the stove. Otherwise, you're better off to use a double boiler. Cook over medium heat, stirring constantly, until it thickens and coats the back of a spoon. NOTE: Curd will thicken as it cools.
  • After filling each pastry with the tree tomato curd, top them with whipped cream and chiffonade of fresh mint and thin-sliced lime as desired. Enjoy!

Nutrition

Calories: 407kcal | Carbohydrates: 37g | Protein: 9g | Fat: 25g

NOTE: Macronutrients are an approximation only using unbranded ingredients and MyFitnessPal.com. Please do your own research with the products you’re using if you have a serious health issue or are following a specific diet.

Did you make this recipe? Please leave a comment and/or star rating! Email us with any questions: tamara@beyondmeresustenance.com

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4 Comments

  1. Thanks so much for once again introducing us to something really exciting and new. Had to check out Tamarillo photos to see if have tried this before. Don’t think we have but I know we would love it. Sweet and tangy, crispy and creamy. It has all of the makings of the perfect dessert. Like that they are bite sized too for portion control.

    1. Bringing the ingredients of Peru and Latin America to the US is my goal, so I’m happy to introduce you to this tasty fruit. I’m going to do a post that is more focused on the ingredient, and if I can remember how to make a video, I’ll do a “how to” video for breaking down the fresh tamarillo. And like you, I’m always looking for portion control in my desserts!

  2. These mini-tarts are really good, and I highly recommend them. They’re also a good introduction to using tree tomatoes/tamarillos in sweet recipes. A batch of tamarillo curd would probably make a great pie (somebody needs to try that).